[Entrevue] “Geolocate love”: give way to queer and poetic TV

Do you ever get sad? Why do you always smile. »In the first episode of the web series geolocalize love, adapted from his novel with poems of the same name, Simon Boulerice answers this question, posed by a child during a class visit. It is true that on television, on the set of This year you hate Have a good evening !we know the author and commentator jovial, perky, smiling, a little eccentric.

However, it is enough to read Simon Boulerice to know that behind laughing eyes and passionate flights hides a complex, sensitive, sometimes even tortured man. “I’m pretty good with happiness,” says Simon of the series. But I assure you, I happen to be sad. “

In ten ten minute episodes, geolocalize love questions the distance, expectations and false perceptions – of others, but above all of oneself – that are created when one looks at the world through the prism of one’s screen. We meet Simon, a 30-year-old who goes through dating apps in hopes of finding a soul mate.

On a trip to the four corners of Montreal, he is torn apart, chaining casual encounters and sexual conquests, often in spite of his self-esteem and dignity. His adventures, at times funny and touching, at times dramatic or full of violence, reveal all the fragility and interiority of a man scared by the loneliness of him – of him and of a generation whose self-esteem and identity are often built. on virtual relationships.

I took a step back, and I have a lot of tenderness for the old Simon, thirsty for love, who so much hoped to feel fulfilled by the other. This all-you-can-eat buffet is a bit dehumanizing, preventing closeness and giving the illusion that elsewhere it is always better. It’s easy to slip and sink into sadness and rejection.

Simon Boulerice ensures that he’s not trying to demonize dating apps with this autofiction – he himself has found love through them. “I took a step back, and I have a lot of tenderness for the old Simone, thirsty for love, whom he so much hoped to feel fulfilled by the other. This all-you-can-eat buffet is a bit dehumanizing, preventing closeness and giving the illusion that elsewhere it is always better. It’s easy to slip and sink into sadness and rejection. But there are also many beautiful things that can arise from it. “

dance and freedom

The series is a reflection of the eclecticism of dating that Tinder and Grindr of this world can give rise to. A protean, atypical object, where humor joins drama, and dance and poetry share the scene with current and current reflections on loneliness and the search for oneself.

Simon Boulerice is visibly satisfied with this adaptation, having fun rejecting possibilities and expectations, not missing an opportunity to improvise a dance step of which only he has the secret, to put on a mankini in neon green lycra, to put oneself in danger, to embrace the ridiculous and the grotesque. “When I write, I like to embrace my vulnerability. I wanted these imperfections to appear on the screen. The writer thus exploits all the dimensions of autofiction and does not hesitate to dig into his personal and media archives to further blur the contours of reality. We are far, here, from the universe of six degreesthe youth drama series scripted by the artist.

This time Simon Boulerice takes advantage of the great freedom offered by the Web format to dive into the homosexual culture. In addition to giving pride of place to the multiplicity of sexual practices, he does not hesitate to show men in their simplest form, which is still rare on Quebec television.

“I wanted the show to be as representative of the queer community as possible and to have diversity in all its forms. I know it’s good to recognize yourself on TV. I also wanted to show that it is not because a sexuality is disposable that it is reprehensible, as long as it is practiced in a space of consent. “

Non-binary character and actor, man in makeup, unbridled sexuality … Simon Boulerice embodies the television we want for the present: inclusive, rich in its diversity and in its absence of codes and taboos, and which refuses to wallow in ease and poverty intellectual.

He is therefore betting on making the poem accessible to as many people as possible by regularly incorporating lines from the original novel into the voiceover. “Your gestures are well honed / You roll up the ledge and you have a chance to win a trip, a family van or an ITS / You ask for a duel and I get asylum / We complement each other well, wanting the opposite of our good / Win, you meet me / I’m never good at convincing / But where is the love in all of this? ”, he declaims after a particularly difficult scene to watch, in which his character is the victim of sexual assault.

“These passages allow me to field something different, through the scenes of jovial vulgarity that the series encompasses. It is a way for the character to speak, to give access to her subconscious. Poetry does not belong only to connoisseurs. I think everyone can be touched by the great beat of a poetic momentum. “

I took a step back, and I have a lot of tenderness for the old Simon, thirsty for love, who so much hoped to feel fulfilled by the other. This all-you-can-eat buffet is a bit dehumanizing, preventing closeness and giving the illusion that elsewhere it is always better. It’s easy to slip and sink into sadness and rejection.

geolocalize love

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