Trend: NFT in design

Lon May 9th Christofle has launched a new version of his bestseller, humor, an egg-shaped box containing silver cutlery, NFT version. In five minutes, the 529 virtual copies were sold for 0.1 ETH (currency unit Ether), or 150 euros each. Proof that if a large majority of the public is not yet familiar with digital worlds, a niche of informed collectors could well grow in the months and years to come.

NFT (non-fungible token, Non-fungible tokens, certificates of authenticity associated with virtual goods) are these digital works (photos, videos, 3D objects, etc.) purchased and collected online. Their owners can view them on any screen. Another important development area: using them in a metaverse to decorate your personal space.

Master in the subject

Nemo, a light publisher, was a pioneer in NFTs. DR

Pioneer of this new wave, Argentine Andrés Reisinger. Previously a designer, he created phantasmagoric furniture on his computer to manage his frustration at not having access to industrial production tools. Given the success of his creations on Instagram, he entered the NFT movement very early on, selling his first collection for around $ 70,000 (€ 70,500). Meanwhile, Canadian Krista Kim has sold it, the first fully digital home for $ 500,000 (€ 504,000) …

closer to us, the examples of NFT multiply: Vincent Darré has signed a collection of original drawings for Monoprix, the lighting editor Nemo has imagined interiors including his iconic lamps, Galerie Kreo has had the duo Barber & Osgerby design one of their chandeliers …

A new wave of creators

After exhibiting the Barber & Osgerby lamps, Galerie Kreo launched its NFT collection with a creation of the duo.

After exhibiting the Barber & Osgerby lamps, Galerie Kreo launched its NFT collection with a creation of the duo. Alessandra de Cossette

If this phenomenon is taking off today, it is not a coincidence, but the result of a combination of several factors. First of all, a generation of videographers, 3D architects, graphic designers … who regularly post their work on Instagram hoping a sign will notice. Now, thanks to NFTs, they can sell their creations directly to their customers who, fed up with the video games for which they buy since their youth skin (which allow, for example, to change the appearance of a character) and other paid options, he is used to paying real money for virtual goods. Thus, traditional publishers and designers have, contrary to what one might think, the perfect profile to take an interest in this new aspect of creation.

«The world of luxury is very creative and if you don’t put yourself in danger you don’t go ahead “, remembers Marie Beaussier, director of Christofle’s offer and products, and of the NFT project. Clémence Krzentowski, owner of Galerie Kreo, who just launched her first NFT in spring, explains: “These are new spaces – and those who say spaces also say“ development ”of these spaces… If you have land and a house in an online world, why not objects? It is a new way of looking at design. “

José Lévy's virtual kokeshi were shown as holograms at the latest PAD Paris.

José Lévy’s virtual kokeshi were shown as holograms at the latest PAD Paris. Leblon Delienne

During the last PAD Paris, where the most avant-garde art and design galleries meet, designer José Lévy offered a virtual variation in the form of holograms of his large Japanese dolls (Kokeshi)developed in resin for Leblon Delienne. “As creatives, we have to deal with everything new, he says. Anything can arouse my curiosity, even what I don’t understand at first. I found it surprising to create the intangible. For a designer, it is a challenge. “

In addition to their thirst for knowledge, the designers are in fact armed with 3D tools and know-how, they are also attentive to the fact that these works are a source of additional income since each resale of NFT applies a resale right. In addition, digital works allow them to get out of their usual constraints, such as gravity or comfort. “Many of the designers we work with have wondered what“ use ”would mean in a virtual universe. The NFT lamp we developed with Barber & Osgerby is a bulbless, cordless and mobile model. She it therefore exists only in animated digital form and is sold exclusively on line. A new lamp for a new world! “ details Clémence Krzentowski.

From real to virtual … and vice versa

Architects and designers Sam Buckley and Anthony Authié imagined five virtual pieces of furniture and the Hexominoes chair for “Design Capsule”.

Architects and designers Sam Buckley and Anthony Authié imagined five virtual pieces of furniture and the Hexominoes chair for “Design Capsule”. Valentino Fougeray

What’s better than the physical world reach an uninitiated audience? Because it is still the whole paradox of this young market that must multiply interactions with reality to exist. Journalist and curator Jean-Christophe Camuset organized during the last Paris Design Week “Design Capsule”, an exhibition-sale of NFT supported by the magazine She Decoration and produced by fifteen couples made up of an architect-designer and a digital artist.

The collaboration of Benoit Challand and Pietro Franceschini on the occasion of the Design Capsule

The collaboration of Benoit Challand and Pietro Franceschini on the occasion of the Design Capsule Franceschini Challand

The works were presented on screens placed in large boxes that float above the 18th century parquet floorAnd of the Hotel de Soubise, within a scenography by Sam Baron. Six tandems have also chosen to create, display and sell materialized objects of their NFTs. These will be offered for sale in a permanent gallery on the SuperRare digital platform. Prices will range from € 3,000 for NFT alone to € 50,000 for NFT and physical work.

The virtual does not hunt so not quite the real thing … Star Andrés Reisinger has finally seen his chair Hydrangea published by Moooï while Christofle puts a novelty on the real market humor whose engraving is inspired by horizon fromAurifaber Citatis, virtual city developed in parallel …

The “Chambre 36” project by designer Harry Nuriev takes up one of the rooms of the Louisiane hotel.

The “Chambre 36” project by designer Harry Nuriev takes up one of the rooms of the Louisiane hotel. Harry Nuriev

Combine the physical and the digital, this is the case of Harry Nuriev, a young designer who has always created objects influenced by the virtual. This “phygital” fan invades several spaces until mid-October, including a room in the iconic hotel in the Saint-Germain district of Paris, La Louisiane, as part of the Bienvenu Design fair. “I wanted to project the past spirits and ghosts of this mythical place into the future and then I had the idea of ​​developing five NFTs that echo my vision of room 36. I am convinced that, in the future, digital will allow people to connect to the past. and I want to be part of that story “, He said.

Of course, this universe under construction raises many questions, starting with the purchasing system, because in order to afford these digital works, one must first acquire cryptocurrencies. The energy consumption of blockchains (databases) is also a sensitive topic. Finally, what about the adoption by the general public of technologies still reserved for a small part of the population? Reply in the next few months …

> Discover the NFT projects of the designer Andrés Reisinger.

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